Global Statistics

All countries
653,060,273
Confirmed
Updated on December 10, 2022 10:06 AM
All countries
609,816,036
Recovered
Updated on December 10, 2022 10:06 AM
All countries
6,657,373
Deaths
Updated on December 10, 2022 10:06 AM

Global Statistics

All countries
653,060,273
Confirmed
Updated on December 10, 2022 10:06 AM
All countries
609,816,036
Recovered
Updated on December 10, 2022 10:06 AM
All countries
6,657,373
Deaths
Updated on December 10, 2022 10:06 AM

Long COVID May Develop A New Symptom to Feel Exhausted Post Workout

Those who recovered after having a long COVID are known to have been facing a number of health related problems for long.

Some of these symptoms associated include mood changes, trouble sleeping, anxiety, fatigue, Brain fog and many more.

And now, another symptom of long COVID has joined in the list.

As per a new study conducted in this regard, it has been shown that long COVID may have been associated with reduced workout capacity in the affected people.

The workout capacity is generally measured by looking at how much oxygen your body can use and the behavioral functions of your heart and lung at the time of workouts.

The study was published in JAMA Network. The researchers are known to have analyzed up to 350 people who recovered from COVID-19 infection as compared to another 250 people who mainly experienced symptoms to COVID to test their peak oxygen consumed during exercise (known as VO2 max).

In their study, all the participants were made to workouts using a stationary bike or a treadmill.

While they continued to devote their time doing exercises, the team of researchers measured the functions of their heart and lungs.

Later, it was revealed that those affected with long COVID had lower peak oxygen levels as compared to those who recovered fully.

The above task was expressed using the metabolic equivalent of tasks (METs) measuring energy expended during exercise.

In their unique study, the team of researchers simply concluded that patients followed a “modest but consistent” pattern as compared to those with long COVID who met with a reduced workout capacity in the long run.

The sole author of the above study, Dr. Priscilla Hsue, at the University of California, San Francisco suggested, “Trials of potential therapies are urgently needed, including studies of rehabilitation to address deconditioning, as well as further investigation into dysfunctional breathing, damage to the nerves that control automatic body functions and the inability to increase the heart rate adequately during exercise,” she stated.

 

Also Read: Study Finds An Increased COVID-19 Risk On Pregnant Women, Children, Newborn In the First Year of Pandemic

 

 

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